Article

21 July 2017

On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century by Timothy Snyder

Category: New publications, Editorial notes, XXw, Research projects, News, Social history, Economic history, Cultural history, Memory studies

 

New book by Timothy Snyder about tyranny has become #1 on the New York Times bestseller list.

 

An historian of fascism offers a guide for surviving and resisting America’s turn towards authoritarianism.

The Founding Fathers tried to protect us from the threat they knew, the tyranny that overcame ancient democracy. Today, our political order faces new threats, not unlike the totalitarianism of the twentieth century. We are no wiser than the Europeans who saw democracy yield to fascism, Nazism, or communism.  The American advantage is that we might learn from their experience.

Timothy Snyder is the Levin Professor of History at Yale University. He is the author of Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin and Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning. Snyder is a member of the Committee on Conscience of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and a permanent fellow of the Institute for Human Sciences in Vienna.

 

“We are rapidly ripening for fascism. This American writer leaves us with no illusions about ourselves.” —Svetlana Alexievich, Winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature

“Timothy Snyder reasons with unparalleled clarity, throwing the past and future into sharp relief. He has written the rare kind of book that can be read in one sitting but will keep you coming back to help regain your bearings. Put a copy in your pocket and one on your bedside table, and it will help you keep going for the next four years or however long it takes.” —Masha Gessen

“Please read this book. So smart, so timely.” —George Saunders

 

Publisher: Penguin Random House

Year of publication: 2017

ISBN-10: 0804190119

ISBN-13: 978-0804190114

 

 

 

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